Home Remedies
Marjoram Herb - Uses And Side Effects   Connect Us on FB
Aconite
Agrimony
Allspice
Aloe
American Cranesbill
Angelica
Anise
Arnica
Avens
Balsam Peru
Barberry
Basil
Bay
Bayberry
Bearberry
Benzoin
Betel Pam
Bethroot
Bethony
Bilberry
Birch
Bistort
Black Catechu
Blackroot
Bloodroot
Blue Cohosh
Blue Flag
Bogbean
Boldo
Boneset
Borage
Broom
Buchu
Buckthron
Bugleweed
Burdock
Butterbur
Cacao tree
Calumba
Capsicum
Celandine
Celery
Centaury
Chamomile
Chaparral
Chaste tree
Chaulmoogra oil
Chickweed
Chicory
Cinnamon
Daffodil
Daisy
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
DHEA
Dill
Dong Quai
Dopamine
Elderberry
Elecampane
Elecampane
Ephedra
Eucalyptus
Eyebright
False Unicorn Root
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Figwort
Flax
Fumitory
Galangal
Galanthamine
Garlic
Gentian
Lady's Mantle
Lady's Slipper
Lavender
Licorice
Lily of the valley
Lobelia
Lovage
Lungwort
Madder
Male Fern
Mallow
Marigold Flower
Marjoram
Marshmallow
Mayapple
Meadowsweet
Milk Thistle
Mint
Mistletoe
Motherwort
Mugwort
Mullein
Pareira
Parsley Piert
Parsley
Passion Flower
Pau D'arco
Peach

Home :: Marjoram :: Herbs

Marjoram Herb - Uses And Side Effects

Early Greeks believed marjoram was cultivated by Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. The herb is still added to love potions and placed in hope chests or under a woman's pillow to ensure a happy marriage. The Food and Drug Administration regards marjoram as generally safe.

Marjoram is native to Europe and grows wild on dry sunny slopes, hedge banks, roadsides and in grassland, usually on lime-rich soils. It is locally common in England and Wales but rarer farther north. It is also cultivated commercially in many countries but most supplies are still collected from the wild in the Mediterranean region. Marjoram can be grown as a houseplant while still small. Place it in a sunny window. After your have enjoyed it all winter, plant it outdoors after all danger of frost. If you have limited space, try this herb in a container on your patio or deck.

Typically, products identified as marjoram are the dried leaves and flowering tops of Origanum majorana L, a member of the mint family (Labiatae). However, similar species exist. The name "wild marjoram" usually refers to O. vulgare, more commonly known as oregano.

Common doses of marjoram

Marjoram comes as dried or powdered leaves and a tea. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As a tea, steep 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried leaves and flower tops for 10 minutes in 1 cup of boiling water. Drink no more than 3 cups daily.
  • As a tincture, 1/2 to 1 teaspoon taken orally three times daily.

Uses of marjoram herb

  • As a snakebite antidote
  • Bruises
  • Conjunctivitis (infection of the eye's inner lining)
  • Cough
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Lack of menstruation
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Motion sickness
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Nausea
  • Sharp intestinal pains in infants

Marjoram is a favourite kitchen herb, especially in Italy where it is used to flavour pizzas and spaghetti dishes. It has a stronger taste than Sweet Marjoram (Origanum majorana).

Side effects of marjoram

Call your health care practitioner if you experience unusual symptoms when using marjoram.

Although apparently no one has been harmed by consuming marjoram, product labels on certain preparations of the essential oil warn against internal use. The marjoram ingredients thymol and hydroquinone may be poisonous.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you're taking.

Important points to remember

  • If you're pregnant, don't use marjoram in amounts larger than those commonly used in cooking. An overdose carries a slight risk of uterine contractions.
  • Be aware that researchers don't know if the herb is safe for infants and children.
  • Avoid using the volatile oil.
  • Know that the content of some active marjoram components varies among plants and products and that the volatile oil content may decrease with age.
  • Reduce your dose or discontinue the herb if you experience nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Consult your health care practitioner if nausea and diarrhea last more than a few days.
  • Keep marjoram away from the eyes.
  • Know that medical experts caution against consuming more marjoram than you'd normally find in foods.
  • Be aware that thyme, not marjoram, is the source of the essential oils called "Oil of Marjoram" and "Wild Marjoram Oil."

What the research shows

Marjoram extracts help ease spasms, which may account for their use in treating nausea, sharp intestinal pains, and menstrual cramps. The herb is considered a safe food additive, so consuming moderate amounts in food or tea probably won't cause harm and may even relieve nausea, sharp intestinal pains, and cramps.

In the test tube, certain marjoram components (thymol and carvacrol) help fight bacteria, viruses, and fungi. However, their concentrations vary widely, making them unreliable for treating infections. As a toothache remedy, marjoram's effects may come from thymol's ability to combat oral bacteria. Still, medical experts recommend conventional drugs instead to treat suspected oral infections.

Little evidence supports marjoram's other therapeutic claims. Experts caution people to restrict marjoram to oral intake or topical use on the skin. They warn against applying it to open wounds, rashes, or the eye.

Other names for marjoram : -

Other names for marjoram include common marjoram, knotted matjoram, oleum majoranae (oil), oregano, sweet marjoram, and wild marjoram.

Products containing marjoram are sold under such names as Marjoram and Sweet Marjoram Essential Oil.


Home Remedies || Herbal Teas || Contact Us || Vitamins || Minerals || Home Remedies Blog || Injuries || Green Tea || Stretch Marks || Colon Cleansing || HGH || Acai Berry

Bookmark and Share

(c)Copyright Best-home-remedies.com. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer : All information on Best-Home-Remedies.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor. We will not be liable for any complications, or other medical accidents arising from the use of any information on this web site.