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Home :: Mugwort :: Herbs

Mugwort Herb - Uses And Side Effects

In Chinese traditional medicine, mugwort is used for moxa treatments. Small cones of dried mugwort leaves are burned in cups on certain points of the body, many of which coincide with acupuncture points.

Mugwort abounds on hedgebanks and waysides in most parts of England. It is a tall-growing plant, the stems, which are angular and often of a purplish hue, frequently rising 3 feet or more in height. The leaves are smooth and of a dark green tint on the upper surface, but covered with a dense cottony down beneath; they are once or twice pinnately lobed, the segments being lanceshaped and pointed. The flowers are in small oval heads with cottony involucres and are arranged in long, terminal panicles; they are either reddish or pale yellow. The Mugwort is closely allied to the Cornmon Wormwood, but may be readily distinguished by the leaves being white on the under-surfaces only and by the leaf segments being pointed, not blunt. It lacks the essential oil of the Wormwood.

Herbalists prepare mugwort from the dried leaves and roots of Artemisia vulgaris. This shrubby perennial from the daisy family (Compositae) is native to North America. It sometimes is confused with wormwood (Artemisia absinthium).

Common doses of mugwort

Mugwort comes as dried leaves and roots, fluid extract, infusion, and tincture. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • For stress, S. milliliters of root tincture taken orally 30 minutes before bedtime.
  • For heavy menstruation, drink an infusion of 15 grams of dried herb added to 500 milliliters of water, or take up to 2.5 milliliters of the tincture orally three times daily.
  • To stimulate the appetite, 150 milliliters of boiling water poured over 1 to 2 teaspoons of the dried herb. Let steep for 5 to 10 minutes and strain. Drink two to three cups before meals.
  • For other complaints, take 1 to 4 milliliters of the tincture orally three times daily.

Use of mugwort

Mugwort has stimulant and slightly tonic properties, and is of value as a nervine and emmenagogue, having also diuretic and diaphoretic action. Specifically, mugwort may help to:-

  • Anxiety, stress, insomnia
  • Asthma
  • Bacterial and fungal infections
  • Diarrhea, cramps, intestinal gas
  • Epilepsy
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Menopause symptoms
  • Menstrual complaints
  • Mild depression
  • Muscle spasms
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Skin inflammation
  • Tapeworms and other worms

It is a common ingredient in herbal smoking blends, along with coltsfoot and passionflower .

Side effects of mugwort

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of mugwort:

  • skin inflammation
  • symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, such as chest tightness, wheezing, hives, itching, and rash.

Mugwort can strongly stimulate the uterus.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don't use mugwort while taking blood thinners such as Coumadin.

Important points to remember

  • Don't use mugwort if you're pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Avoid this herb if you have a bleeding disorder or acid reflux disease.
  • Don't use mugwort if you've ever had an allergic reaction to mugwort or if you're allergic to hazelnuts.
  • Be aware that mugwort pollen is a known allergen that contributes to hay fever in some people.

What the research shows

No scientific studies support the long list of therapeutic claims for mugwort. Without persuasive evidence, medical experts won't recommend this herb for any use.

Other names for mugwort : -

Other names for mugwort include ai ye, felon herb, St. John's plant, Summitates artemisiae, and wild wormwood.


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